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We're a national grassroots organization of 2 million Americans working together to protect Medicare Advantage. Join Today!

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2 Million Voices & Growing to Protect Medicare Advantage

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Helping the More than 5 Million Americans with Alzheimer’s

NOVEMBER 08, 2019

Today, more than 5.8 million Americans are battling Alzheimer’s, a serious form of dementia that affects memory and behavior. It is especially prevalent among seniors, with more than 40% of those affected being 65 and older. During, National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month this November, it’s important that we find ways to support the millions of Americans and their families who are confronted by this disease. For some, picking a Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans (SNPs) could help.

Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans (SNPs) are specifically tailored to serve Americans with chronic illnesses like Alzheimer’s. Today, SNPs delivers reliable services and access to care to nearly 3 million Americans. Most plans cover benefits not covered by that traditional Medicare like access to prescription drugs.

Additionally, Americans with Alzheimer’s disease who are covered by the Medicare Advantage program can see even greater support in 2020. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has made significant changes to the program, expanding benefits that offer greater support, including:

  • Adult daycare
  • Non-medical caretakers
  • Home modifications like bath steps and rail grabs
  • Assisted living

Every day, millions of Americans and their families are impacted by Alzheimer’s disease, and according to Alzheimer’s Association, the number of Americans affected is expected to rise. In the case of Americans who are 65 and older, 1 in 3 passes away with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. However, this can be mended with the help of early diagnosis. Any program that improves access to timely care is a step closer to helping millions overcome Alzheimer’s disease.